Can you help fix my domain’s email?

[Update 12-30-20: Fixed!! See below]
Can you help fix my domain’s spam reputation problem? I’m happy to pay for professional help.

Whenever I send email to a new person at gmail from my domain name, Lee.org, it falls into their spam folder. After they mark my email as “not spam”, recipients can receive further emails.

This is probably happening because, until July 2018, my domain was being used by spammers to send junk mail. I have since fixed the email settings (SPF, DMARC, DKIM, Google Postmaster Tools) to keep spammers from spoofing my domain but the reputation damage has been done! Mail hosts apparently still don’t trust me! My domain (Lee.org) is definitely not generating any spam and the volume of email sent is very light, there is only one user, me!

Do you have any suggestions as to how to fix my email reputation problem?
I found some random coders on fiverr.com that might help but I’m reluctant to give all my passwords to random people on the internets!

Update 12-30-20:
I wrote to Dreamhost and they responded, essentially, “Sorry about that, we fixed the thing that you couldn’t have possibly known was broken. You’re good now”

Some time ago, we started using a service called MailChannels to help us with our incoming and outgoing spam filtering. It looks like for some reason, your SPF record hadn’t been updated to authorize MailChannels, so, considering your DMARC settings, normal messages being sent from DreamHost were being marked as spam. I apologize about this, I’ve taken the correct steps to fix this and it should help with your outgoing messages not being marked as spam in the future.

I sent a few emails to friends (thanks Kayte and Carol!) and yeah, lee.org is now sending emails to not-spam-folders again! Hurray!

Vacation to the Sierra Nevada Mountains

Just got back from a really enjoyable trip to the Sierra Nevada mountains with podmates. Feeling a bit more relaxed. Hurray!

The Pleiades peeking out from behind the trees at our place in the mountains

Zoom tip: Turn on Keystroke Suppression on Your Computer’s Microphone

This will make it so your microphone doesn’t pick up all the clicky-clacky while you’re on Zoom calls. It uses a little CPU to do the audio processing but works pretty well.

Turn on keystroke suppression on your computer’s microphone. This works for the Lenovo Thinkpad T470s and maybe other computers.

Tap the Windows key. Type “control panel” and hit Enter. In the search bar in the upper right, type “audio” and hit Enter. Click on “Manage audio devices”. Double-click on the “Recording” tab. Click on the “Microphone Array” icon. Click on the “Enhancements” tab. Click on the “Keystroke Suppression” checkbox.

Abigail at School

Ok, this is a ridiculously long image but it’s a beautiful view into Abigail’s (not technically) Kindergarten at Step One!

Maybe right-click and open link in a new tab. then click on that image.

Muting and Unmuting Zoom Participants at School

I recently found this setting on Zoom for our school district and found it tremendously helpful! The host of a Zoom meeting can mute and unmute the participants in their Zoom classroom after changing a setting and getting permission from the participant. Here’s a video tutorial I made showing how to do it: https://youtu.be/j96BJcho_ec. Make sure to ask permission so the students don’t see this as an invasion of their privacy. Share this tip as you choose, some teachers will find it indispensable.
If you can’t find the “unmute” option in the menu, you probably need to upgrade your Zoom software. It’ll take just a minute: In the Zoom program, click on your face in the upper right corner of the window. Then click on “Check for Updates”.  Then do the instructions from the video above.
The unmute feature probably isn’t available if you are using a personal license of Zoom.

Lest We Forget The Horrors

Early in President Trump’s term, McSweeney’s editors began to catalog the head-spinning number of misdeeds coming from his administration. We called this list a collection of Trump’s cruelties, collusions, and crimes, and it felt urgent then to track them, to ensure these horrors — happening almost daily — would not be forgotten. This election year, amid a harrowing global health, civil rights, humanitarian, and economic crisis, we know it’s never been more critical to note these horrors, to remember them, and to do all in our power to reverse them.

Find the list here

A local copy here

 

(via JWZ)

Happy Thanksgiving

We managed a happy Thanksgiving with our podmates. Wishing you a happy Thanksgiving as well!

Ripping DVDs To Use On Plex

I only have one DVD drive in the house and no DVD drive connected to our new “smart” tv. So here’s how we watch DVD movies on the Smart TV.

First, set up Plex It’s a Windows program that let’s you serve videos around your house. They’ll also rent you videos and such. I leave the computer running all the time.

  • Use DVDDecrypter to rip a copy of the DVD onto my computer. I use the rip below and also save it since the DVD format with commentary and extras isn’t saved perfectly in the next few steps.
  • Sometimes DVDDecrypter craps out. When that happens, I try using MakeMKV to rip the DVD. Failing that, I try using VLC. Failing that, I get a copy from ThePirateBay.
  • Point MakeMKV at the rip and turn the DVD into several .mkv files. The big file (usually 1-6 gigabytes) is the movie and then there’s often extras like a Making-of and such.
  • Move the big file directly into my Plex movies folder
  • Use MKVToolNix GUI to merge all the other files together into one because I like having a “Movie” and a “Movie extras” file but having 5-10 “extras” files is just a cluttered mess.
  • Look at the created “extras” file and make sure it worked. I don’t know exactly why but some merges don’t work. 1/2 way through the merged video, the audio or picture will crap out. This might be because the merged files were in different formats or something. If it doesn’t work, I abandon the “extras”, I haven’t figured out how to fix that problem.
  • Some videos have trouble fast forwarding and rewinding on Plex, especially on my Visio TV. I found that if I transcode them into H.264 using Handbrake (mp4 format, Align A/V start (dunno if I need it but it doesn’t hurt)) I don’t have that problem any more. I’ve had this problem with some videos downloaded from the internet. H.265 makes the smallest files but Plex handles H.264 natively so it doesn’t have to pin the CPU on the server to transcode it on the fly. It takes 1-5 hours to transcode a movie in Handbrake, depending on your settings, so set up the Queue and run it overnight!

Notes on above:

  • The rip takes about an hour. The other steps take just 1-5 minutes total.
  • To use MKVToolNix GUI: drag the first file onto the Source Files area. Then grab the rest of the files and drag them there. It’ll ask how you want to add them, choose “Append to an existing source file”. Then push the “Start multiplexing” button at the bottom. It might throw an error and refuse to merge the files. This is because the files are, in some way, not the same type. Look in the error log. A common error is “The number of channels of the two audio tracks is different.” To fix that, I use Handbrake to transcode all the files, making sure to set the audio “mixdown” to “stereo”; that way, fancy Dolby 5.1 audio is pushed down to stereo. This doesn’t always fix the problem. I haven’t figured out all the fixes yet, sometimes I just bail on putting all the extras into one file.

 

A Return to Political Civility

Here is a political message for people tired of political messages. Hint: a return to civility.

Still With the Gmail Spam

I review my Gmail spam folder monthly, do you? How many spams do you get a month? I get about 2,000 spams/month and there’s always about 20 legit emails in that fetid pile. I’ve always got to wash my eyeballs after my monthly review session. It may have something to do with me owning such a short domain name and my shadow life as an unintentional  purveyor of spam.