EmoniNail is a Scam

EmoniNail is a new topical nail fungus treatment. Only, it isn’t. It’s a scam.

Why do I think it’s a scam?

  1. Their website is vague about its (common, inexpensive) ingredient list, and about how it works.
  2. The website makes vague but compelling promises that not even the best doctor and medical treatment could keep.
  3. It is expensive enough for you to hope that it might work but not break-the-bank expensive.
  4. The company has created a bunch of fake review sites saying how great their product is, trying to hide critical reviews like mine.
  5. Their web design looks so much like many other scam anti-fungal treatments that it is clearly the same bad people trying to market the same bad product under a fresh name. Similar scam products are Funginix, and Zeta Clear.

Do not buy EmoniNail. For more information about nail fungus products that work and don’t work, read my blog posts about nail fungus.

Here is a short summary of all my blog posts on the subject of nail fungus: the over-the-counter topicals at your local pharmacy ($20) sometimes clear up nail fungus. It appears that is what’s in Emoninail (undecylenic acid). Lamisil (generic terbinafine) topical ($30) or oral ($2000) is one drug that has better than average results. Going to a podiatrist and getting drugs, or your nail ripped out, or both ($50-$3000) might work. Sadly, modern science doesn’t have a guaranteed cure for nail fungus. Don’t believe anyone that says otherwise.

 

8 Comments

  1. Todd Weinfield says:

    Lee –

    You’re right, most OTC treatments for nail fungus will not cure the infection. Even the fine print on Zetaclear’s web site states: “This product is not intended to cure any disease.” Prescription medications aren’t much better. The biggest obstacle in curing nail infections is getting a powerful antifungal to the infection in high enough concentration and with the right modes of action to kill the fungus AND its spores. Such medication exists (and is safe) – but it’s not well known. It’s called ToeMate and soaks the infected nail in warm antifungal solution – a little less convenient, but MUCH more effective. Treatment times are 1- 3 months. Web site is thetoematestore.com. Hope this helps, Todd

  2. lee says:

    Todd, (updated 2-25-19) has it worked for you? I browsed the ToeMate site again and I’m not sure about what I wrote previously so I struck it out. I have no experience with it and I don’t have the time right now to research it.

    the ToeMate website has exactly the same problems with it as the EmoniNail site.

    – The website doesn’t say what ingredients are in it or how it works.
    – The website makes vague but compelling promises that not even the best doctor and medical treatment could keep.
    – It is expensive enough for you to hope that it might work but not break-the-bank.

    What were you thinking about when you posted this to my site?

    ToeMate is so clearly a scam, it doesn’t deserve it’s own post.

  3. Constance Royval says:

    Thank you for your info. I was 15 seconds away from ordering. But wanted to look for just WHERE the product was being made,not just shipped from. Sorry,but I am picky about things. Not really worried about something I will paint on one toenail. I have been sanding it down with my dremel tool and the breaking it off so as to get medication on to my skin.So it is not vanity that is my concern. My the idea of the fungus being transmitted into the nodules that flare up in my eyes. Tiny things that cause terrible pain and seen only under a scope,but part of my R.A.. As of now,the anti fungal for ANY condition sounds better than nothing. I refuse to cut off my toe!(just kidding). Once again==tank you.not just for saving me the $125==but keeping me off their “HIT LIST” and pizzing me off big time. l Koni Royval

  4. Billy thomas says:

    Retard.

  5. Dave says:

    The website does say the ingredients in it and how it works so not sure what you are talking about. emoninail.com/pages/how-it-works

    by penetrating the nail plate and delivering powerful anti-fungal agents directly into the Nail Bed where the fungal infection has taken root.

    The active ingredient Undecylenic Acid (An FDA recognized anti-fungal) with world-renowned essential oils like Tea Tree Oil and Sunflower Seed Oil. They have a complete product label attached.

  6. lee says:

    Dave, thank you. I updated my post to be more accurate. I changed “Their website doesn’t say what ingredients are in it or how it works.” to
    “Their website is vague about it’s (common, inexpensive) ingredient list, and about how it works.” A major difficulty with nail antifungals is that they have trouble getting through the nailbed. There is no mention on their site how they succeed where the rest of science has failed.

  7. lee says:

    I got this nastygram via Facebook Messenger, of all places. What a clear demonstration of how bad the EmoniNail people are, trying to muscle my opinion off the internet.

    Just to be clear, everything I wrote above is true. It’s not libel if it’s true. And DMCA takedown notices aren’t used for the purpose he is trying to use it for. It is to force people to remove from the internet material that is published without approval from the copyright holder. On the other hand, his letter to me has several lies that I’ve pointed out in bold.

    From: Amiel Gregorio on Facebook Messenger, JAN 6, 2019, 8:35 PM https://www.facebook.com/amielgregorio

    Takedown Notice

    Infringing Page: https://www.lee.org/blog/2017/08/21/emoninail-is-a-scam/

    Dear Site owner and/or DMCA Compliance Officer:

    My name is Amiel Gregorio, I represent GG Healthworks, Inc, the owners of EmoniNail. The website, referenced above, that your company owns (according to WHOIS information and contact page) is infringing on at least one Trademark owned by my employer.

    Your website, “reviews” fungal nail products and makes recommendations based, on information and belief, referral payments. Their methodology and their inherent bias due to referral payments (There are no “referral payments”. I don’t make any money from the site) , are not disclosed to consumers. They intend that consumers rely on this information and encourage purchasing decisions based on their conjecture and false statements (none of my statements are false).

    Pertinent to this takedown demand is the fact the website has copied and currently displays the trademarked term in violation of US federal law. (It is not a violation of the law to mention a product. I assume the trademarked term he refers to is “Emoninail”)

    Not only does this site violate trademark law by using my employer’s property without their permission, but they also deceive customers through deceptive statements, claims, and recommendations for competing products (and which deceptive statements would that be?). Such illegal activities will not be tolerated.

    This letter is official notification under the provisions of Section 512(c) of the Digital Millennium
    Copyright Act (“DMCA”), 17 U.S.C. § 512(c), to effect removal of the above-reported infringements. I request that you immediately remove the page in violation.

    I am providing this notice in good faith and with the reasonable belief that the trademark my employer owns is being infringed.

    Should you wish to discuss this with me please contact me directly either via email (You didn’t leave your email address so umm…).

    Please send me a prompt response indicating the actions you have taken to resolve this matter.

    Sincerely,
    Amiel Gregorio

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