More Amazingness from Washington DC

The Udvar-Hazy National Air and Space Museum
Mouse-over this panorama! (yes, I took this with my phone and stitched it together)
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Or look at the whole image:

A 2 hour long docent tour flew by in just a few moments in this phenomenal hall.

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Infinity Nets Yellow by Yayoi Kusama. These images don’t do it justice. Standing in front of the painting, the patterns swirl with a mix of intention and abandon.

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No More Dry Runs by Kim Rugg. A close inspection shows that an actual newspaper was cut into thousands of pieces. Complete nonsense (?) was born of sense.

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I saw parts of Goddard’s first rocket at the National Air and Space Museum… the first liquid fueled rocket. That filled me with glee. And I was amazed at seeing the backup Hubble mirror, one of the most perfectly formed objects ever built. What set me most at ease though were a pair of giant war rockets at the entrance to the National Air and Space Museum. A Pershing II and SS-20 missile, so large their noses almost touch the 4 story ceiling of the museum. Each missile carried multi-kiloton nuclear warheads, launched 3,000 miles from their target, delivering their payload in just a few minutes, travelling so fast they were essentially unstoppable. These two hulks sit, stripped of their innards because they were outlawed by international treaty. The world doesn’t need mutually assured destruction. I am so glad the Cold War is over.
I framed the picture a little off. I took the photo with my right hand and I’m giving a big thumbs-up with my left.


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